Three Tips to Safe Holiday Travels

Safe Holiday Travels
Don’t Text & Drive

Thousands and thousands of people will be hitting the road soon for their annual Holiday visits. There will be whole families, young couples, and individual students driving home from school to visit their parents over Thanksgiving and Christmas. If you’re driving home this Holiday season, use these tips from Wilson GM for safe Holiday Travels along the way.

Check The Weather

Before you head out, take a quick look at the weather forecast and at the current radar. Watch for any potential storms heading in the direction of your route. If possible, consider waiting it out, or go into your drive prepared to take your time. Be sure to equip your vehicle with important safety tools, too, like extra food and water, reflective cones, and jumper cables.

Stay Visible

Whether you’re driving in the rain or in the middle of a sunny day, it’s always important to take the necessary steps to ensure that you’re 100% visible. Clean your headlights before you depart, and make sure that all headlights and taillights are working properly.

Put Your Cell Phone Away

You know that cell phones are dangerous distractions in cars, so why tempt yourself? Put your cell phone where it cannot be reached from the driver’s seat so you won’t be tempted to peek. It’s a good idea to take frequent breaks when driving long distances anyway, so allow yourself time to stop every couple of hours for a break and a social media check.

Do you agree? Tell all of us at Evansville Genesis in Evansville, IN in the comments below!

Towing Safety Tips

2017 Chevy Silverado 3500HD

Now that summertime is here, you will likely see a lot more people towing things with their pickups—taking boats to the lake, hauling a trailer filled with building materials, and more. If you plan on towing with your Chevrolet Silverado this summer, here are some towing safety tips.

  • Allow more time to stop. When towing something, the weight of the trailer is added to the total weight of the truck. This means it will take longer to stop. Start braking sooner than you would normally and avoid hard stops.
  • Check trailer height. When hitched together, both your truck and trailer should be nearly parallel to the ground. Do not overload the hitch.
  • Check your trailer lights. With a trailer behind your truck, your taillights will likely be obscured. Make sure all of your trailer lights are working, even in daylight.
  • Inspect your trailer. Once you have everything hooked up, do a thorough inspection of your hitch, trailer, and anything on it. In addition, you should stop and check again after 1, 10, and 100 miles in case anything comes loose while driving.
  • Bring along trailer parts. Just like a car, a trailer can break down, too. Bring along a spare tire and any other tools needed to fix your trailer.

If you need a new pickup this summer, come visit us at Wilson GM and check out the full lineup of Silverado trucks.